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  • Euterpe

  • In Greek mythology, Euterpe (/juːˈtɜːrpiː/; Greek: Eὐτέρπη, Greek pronunciation: [efˈterpi]; "rejoicing well" or "delight" from Ancient Greek εὖ 'well' + τέρπειν terpein 'to please' was the one of the Muses, presiding over music.

    In late Classical times, she was named muse of lyric poetry. She has been called “Giver of delight” by ancient poets.

    Euterpe was born as one of the daughters of Mnemosyne, Titan goddess of memory, and fathered by Zeus, god of the gods.

    Her sisters include Calliope (muse of epic poetry), Clio (muse of history), Melpomene (muse of tragedy), Terpsichore (muse of dancing), Erato (muse of erotic poetry), Thalia (muse of comedy), Polyhymnia (muse of hymns), and Urania (muse of astronomy). Sometimes they are referred to as water nymphs having been born from the four scared springs on Helicon which flowed from the ground after Pegasus, the winged horse, stamped his hooves on the ground.

    Along with her sister Muses, Euterpe was believed to have lived on Mount Olympus, where she and her sisters entertained their father and the other Olympian gods with their great artistry.

    Later on, tradition also placed them on Mt. Helicon in Boeotia where there was a major cult centre to the goddesses, or on Mt. Parnassus, where the Castallian spring was a favourite destination for poets and artists.